On Stage: Pearlann Part II

The Pillow project @ CP Paris 02/16/2013WHY PITTSBURGH? After the Attack Theatre show, Pearlann was talking with Evelyn Palleja-Vissicchio (of the gone, but much-lamented LABCO Dance) who said to her, “What is it you’re doing? What do you want to do?” No one had ever asked Pearlann that question before. She answered, “I think my goal is [that] I want to get in on a city where there isn’t a lot happening. I want to be, like, the first one in there. Somewhere that doesn’t have a scene, so that I can make my own scene. Where I can do something that is specific to the kind of work that I want. I don’t want to fit into something that’s already going on — I want to start something. Evelyn looked at her and remarked, “Hon, it’s here.” Pearlann had been feeling a little unsatisfied with Pittsburgh because “it wasn’t enough.” The connection was immediate. “I’ll just stay here.” Down the pike years later, she had the opportunity to move to Paris and work there. She felt like a couple of people would have followed her. The reasoning? “Why not?” She knew that she could have gained the same momentum there as she had in Pittsburgh because “the enthusiasm is pretty contagious.” But when faced with the decision, Pearlann concluded that “I loved Pittsburgh too much. Paris never felt as good as Pittsburgh did. It’s prettier, but Pittsburgh is where I made my home and Pittsburgh is where the jazz lived. Home is not something you find; it’s something you make. And…it’s here.”

THE BIRTH OF JAZZ (PORTER-STYLE). She doesn’t go to memory lane very often, but as Pearlann looked back at her work in preparation for the 10th anniversary event, she realized what she was trying to do the entire time. “I was trying to choreograph how I naturally moved without thinking about it, like how I just listen to the music. So I saw all these failed attempts at trying to capture that instinctual live musicality — the choreography — which was not working. I was not satisfied with how I was able to get that out and I never knew why. One moment in 2010, she found herself with a new group of dancers exuding “fresh, young, raw energy. They were excited about what I was doing — it was like a renewal. It was like a New Age. I felt it. And I had to try something different.” So they all went to her house where she taught them how to listen to music, hoping that would help. They began to move, all the while listening differently to the music. “It just clicked. Immediately, suddenly, it just happened. It was a different way of thinking about the dance.” Pearlann had improvised her whole life, but this was how she improvised. “It wasn’t that I was going to invent movement. It wasn’t that I was going to find things in my body. It wasn’t this exploration thing, this investigation thing that a lot of improvisation is. It wasn’t storytelling necessarily. It was thinking of yourself as a musician. Specifically, like, if you were in the band and if you were making music and you were changing the way I listened to the music depending on what you were doing. It just, all of a sudden, felt so right because it wasn’t body-based. It was ear-based — everyone was able to do it. Like anyone.” The ones who connected to it the most were “the ones who felt outcast and ostracized about the idea of dance, whether it was the girl in the back of the class that never was loved back by dance itself or never felt connected to the dance. Or that person in the audience who always wanted to dance, but ‘oh, no no no, I don’t dance. I can’t dance.’ Everyone was able to connect to it because everyone knows how to listen to music. If you take the emphasis off the body and you put it in your ear, then you don’t have to worry about what your body is doing. You just have to listen. Your body will just move as it does if you are given some ideas about motion. I feel that, by doing this, it builds off the idea that improvisation can be a tool, it can be free, but it’s not just putting dancers out there and saying ‘make up something’ or ‘just move as you move.’ It has unified us with this way of working together. We all have this common shared language which is a philosophy we’ve adapted to our lives as well as dance. It has this whole understanding and dictionary and lexicon that’s been associated with it now over the years. It keeps us connected — we can talk in this language. In the moment we’re totally free, but it’s directed. To a lot of people in Pittsburgh, improv can be a dirty word. Choreography has always been seen as more work, edited and whittled down to this fine sculpture. It seems that dancers put more effort into it, while improvisation has often been regarded as effort-less. You don’t have to think about it and plan it. You just make it up. That is not at all what we do. We take improvisation so seriously. We can talk for ages about how we did something, but we won’t be able to tell you what we did. But we’ll talk to you how we did it and we can tell you why we did it, but the what? We just turned it around — the what is just not as important. The movement that comes out is not as important as the intention and how we’re dividing it and how we’re coming about it and where our minds are and where our hearts are. People can take it seriously if you take it seriously. You can’t just make this up. You have to put just as much effort and time, not into the choreography of the steps, but into the philosophy of the work. (I hate to call it work, because it doesn’t feel like work.) You put a lot of time into it, even though, in the moment it feels like it’s happening for the first time.” Pearlann admitted that if the performers aren’t careful to adhere to that philosophy, the dance can lose its cohesiveness. And some people hear that she puts a show together in a week or a few days. “Yes, but we’ve been together every single night for a year understanding our movement. So when the time comes, we can talk about the idea and ‘poof!’ there we go. It’s just that there’s a lot behind that.”

WHAT’S NEXT? There will be more according to Pearlann. More of The Pillow Project, which is good news. But so much more, due to a plethora of ideas that she will change the name. But not that much. So to encompass all that she and her very important collaborators have to offer, it will heretofore be titled The Pillow Projects.

 

 

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